Hitler’s Boat

Pinned on October 13, 2014 at 8:10 pm by Theresa Ramos

Repin
Hitler’s Boat

Berlin, 1940. Seduced by a German woman and beguiled by Hitler’s promise to guarantee the independence of Quebec, a Montreal journalist lends his voice to the Nazi propaganda machine.Forty years later, Christopher Chénier discovers he is the son of a singular man who saved the life of Winston Churchill and played a decisive role in the destiny of the Führer. Was his father a hero or a traitor? Who was the enigmatic Lizbeth, his mother?

Perhaps the answers lie aboard the Helgoland, the boat intended to carry the Führer away from his enemies, now moored on the East coast of Canada. Christopher Chénier undertakes a perilous journey in search of these dead people who gave him life.

Extract: « I, Adolf Hitler, on the day of my fiftieth anniversary, I know nothing about nothing, not even if I am human. I have never directly seen my face. I have never spoken with any other organ than a tongue. Traduttore traditore. I am not sure I had parents, that people exist when I am not around, that I will disappear after my death. I would like to want nothing- to become heavy, frozen, and predictable. But there will always be a fraction of a second when I will not know what is going to happen. I have a nosebleed. I miss my dose of cocaine. It is dawn in Berlin. I await the Russians. I would like to be dispossessed. I would like to become a man without a history. »

¨Here is an amazing tale of love that plays out against the backdrop of a larger drama. It is a wild and fascinating story, an unsettling read from beginning to end.

The novelty of Hitler’s Boat is twofold. The retrospectives at opposition in the story are German and Canadian, and these bring to life a fantasy of espionage rather than one of tragedy. The playful style serves as a counterpoint to the depth of the theme and gives its own originality to the novel.¨ -Gabrielle Pascal, literary critic at Le DevoirBerlin, 1940. Seduced by a German woman and beguiled by Hitler’s promise to guarantee the independence of Quebec, a Montreal journalist lends his voice to the Nazi propaganda machine.Forty years later, Christopher Chénier discovers he is the son of a singular man who saved the life of Winston Churchill and played a decisive role in the destiny of the Führer. Was his father a hero or a traitor? Who was the enigmatic Lizbeth, his mother?

Perhaps the answers lie aboard the Helgoland, the boat intended to carry the Führer away from his enemies, now moored on the East coast of Canada. Christopher Chénier undertakes a perilous journey in search of these dead people who gave him life.

Extract: « I, Adolf Hitler, on the day of my fiftieth anniversary, I know nothing about nothing, not even if I am human. I have never directly seen my face. I have never spoken with any other organ than a tongue. Traduttore traditore. I am not sure I had parents, that people exist when I am not around, that I will disappear after my death. I would like to want nothing- to become heavy, frozen, and predictable. But there will always be a fraction of a second when I will not know what is going to happen. I have a nosebleed. I miss my dose of cocaine. It is dawn in Berlin. I await the Russians. I would like to be dispossessed. I would like to become a man without a history. »

¨Here is an amazing tale of love that plays out against the backdrop of a larger drama. It is a wild and fascinating story, an unsettling read from beginning to end.

The novelty of Hitler’s Boat is twofold. The retrospectives at opposition in the story are German and Canadian, and these bring to life a fantasy of espionage rather than one of tragedy. The playful style serves as a counterpoint to the depth of the theme and gives its own originality to the novel.¨ -Gabrielle Pascal, literary critic at Le Devoir


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